Ireland fines Meta for bad record-keeping

Ireland fines Meta for bad record-keeping

Between June and December, Facebook notified the Federal Trade Commission of 12 distinct data breaches that may have affected up to 30 million users, according to TechCrunch. Because of the DPC’s investigation, Meta, Facebook’s parent company, was fined 17 million euros ($18.6 million USD) as a result.

Ireland fines Meta for bad record-keeping

The DPC found after conducting an investigation into the breaches that Meta had violated the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of the European Union (GDPR). Between June and December 2018, the DPC recognised 12 data breach alerts, according to a news statement issued by the organisation. Following its investigation, the DPC determined that Meta Platforms had failed to put in place adequate technical and organisational measures that would have enabled it to readily demonstrate the security measures that it had implemented in practise to protect EU users’ data, according to a press release from the DPC.

As previously stated by a Meta spokeswoman in an email to TechCrunch, they reject any suggestion that this sanction is connected with any specific security breach:

This fine relates to record-keeping methods from 2018, which have subsequently been revised, rather than a failure to protect individuals’ personal information. We take our responsibilities under the General Data Protection Regulation seriously, and we will carefully review this choice as our procedures continue to grow in the future.

According to TechCrunch, two government agencies have protested to Ireland’s initial draught ruling. However, it did not specify which authorities had objected or whether their concerns had any effect on the DPC’s final determination.

Meta is quick to point out that this is connected to record-keeping practises, but this isn’t a small issue in this case. In fact, it appears as though adequate record-keeping is a recurring issue for the organisation as a whole. A data leak involving 533 million accounts and users from 106 countries occurred on Facebook last year, with the social media platform at the centre of the controversy. Some time later, Facebook announced that people who had been affected would not be told, stating that they were unsure of which users to tell and that there was little that could be done because their data was already available.